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Sights and Sounds Department Collection and State Library Resources

These are our staff picks for some of the most unusual and off-the-beaten-track video documentaries "buried in the stacks" of the Sights & Sounds collection at the Enoch Pratt Free Library/State Library Resource Center. These documentaries cover such unusual and divergent topics as gap-toothed women, Australian cane toads, chewing gum, blue jeans, drive-in movie theatres, "double dutch" jump-roping competitions, the art of dumpster diving for food - even how an outsider artist built an entire village out of recycled bottles. While their digital counterparts, DVDs, have become the reigning attention-getting format of choice for most library patrons, those customers who have held on to their VCRs can still enjoy these VHS offerings that are either hard-to-find or non-existent in DVD format. These hidden treasures are waiting to be discovered in the compact shelving "stacks" area of the Sights & Sounds Department. If you are interested in any of these titles or would like us to help locate audio-visual materials on a related topic, please call us directly at 410-396-4616, fax us at 410-545-7517, or e-mail us at sas@prattlibrary.org

Outstanding Video Documentaries You May Have Missed in Our Collection

30-Second Seduction
An investigation of the modern television commercial, thirty seconds' worth of someone's creative ideas on how to capture the viewer's attention and arouse the viewer's imagination. Emphasizes that commercials talk about everything except the merits of the product. (1985, 28 minutes)
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Advertising and the End of the World
Presents an argument about consumerism and its impact on the earth's future, illustrated with graphics and examples from commercial imagery. (Sut Jhally, 1998, 47 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Affluenza
Using personal stories, expert commentary and old film clips, host Scott Simon helps illustrate the causes and consequences of consumerism in American society. (1997, 56 minutes)
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American Tongues
Rich in humor and regional color, this film by Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker (The Japanese Version, People Like Us, Small Ball, Yeah You Rite!) portrays some of the regional, social, and ethnic differences in American speech and presents various attitudes that people have about these differences. From Boston Brahmins to Black Louisiana teenagers, from Texas cowboys to New York professionals, American Tongues elicits funny, perceptive, sometimes shocking and always telling comments on American English in all its diversity. (Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker, 1987, 51 minutes)
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Atomic Café
The best Atomic/Civil Defense Paranoia documentary. This collage film focuses on the 40's and 50's, showing clips of soldiers wearing sunglasses going into areas devastated by nuclear detonation and suburban families practicing using their bomb shelters. Highlights include Bert the Turtle singing “Duck and Cover.” An entertaining look at how we got where we are. (Jayne Loader and Kevin Rafferty, 1982, 92 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Babakiueria
This satirical Australian film uses role-reversal to ridicule the colonialization of indigenous people, specifically the relations between indigenous Australians and Australians of European descent. The opening scene depicts a group of uniformed black indigenous Australians coming ashore in a small boat, watched by various European Australians engaged in typical beachside activities. The group from the boat approaches one of these and asks, "What do you call this place?", receiving the reply, "Er... Barbecue  Area," which is misunderstood to be the fictitious country of "Babakiueria." It presents many contemporary Aboriginal issues including white people as a minority, the unequal treatment of whites by the police, white children are taken from their families or white people being moved because the government needs their home for "something". The paternalistic policies of the BabaKiueria government are defended by Wagwan, the Minister for White Affairs. The film won the 1987 United Nations Media Peace Prize. (Don Featherstone, 1986, 28 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Barbara’s Dollhouse
This is the story of Barbara Whiteman, curator of the Philadelphia Doll Museum, a collection of Black dolls located in Barbara's living room. (1999, 20 minutes)
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Barbie Nation: An Unauthorized Tour
Journeying from Barbie conventions to anti-Barbie demonstrations, from girls' play dates to Barbie web pages, Barbie nation plumbs the cult of the Barbie doll, telling the Barbie stories of diverse men, women and children. Also tells the story of Barbie creator and Mattel co-founder Ruth Handler. (Susan Stern, 1998, 53 minutes)
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Black Magic
Focuses on a prize-winning double dutch team, a group of young girls from inner-city Hartford who excel at jumping rope. Depicts the sport, the girls, and their contest victory prize, a trip to England. (1989, 60 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Blue Jeans
This is the story of blue jeans, which began with Levi's first button fly jeans in the 1870s for cowboys and miners in the states and a century later became a worldwide wardrobe phenomenon. Blue Jeans combine comfort, practicality and sex appeal- spanning all generations and all political persuasions. This entertaining and informative documentary looks at all the different stages of development of the blue jeans: a symbol of rebellion in the 50s when they were worn by the "bad boys" - James Dean, Marlon Brando and Elvis, a uniform of nonconformity in the 60s, designer wear in the 70s... with interviews, film clips, and archival footage. (Landmark media, 1992, 53 minutes, Public Performance Rights).
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Cane Toads
A documentary detailing the spread of Hawaiian sugar-cane toads through Australia in a botched effort to introduce them as counter pests. (directed by Mark Lewis,
Australia, 1987, 40 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Catonsville Nine: Investigation of a Flame
Examines the case of the Catonsville Nine, an unlikely disparate band of antiwar protesters who broke the law in a poetic act of civil disobedience. Includes interviews with members of the Catonsville Nine. (Lynne Sachs, 2001, 45 minutes)
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Chewing Gum: A Sticky Habit
A video history of one of America's most famous products, chewing gum, from its invention and release in 1871, through concentrated advertising campaigns, and eventual export to and impact on foreign markets. The film attempts to explain why chewing gum consumption has increased so dramatically since the end of World War II.  The second part of the program describes the manufacturing processes of chewing gum and bubble gum.  Also included is the use of chewing gum as an art form and as a replacement for cigarettes. (Francoise Levie, 1993, 45 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Chulas Fronteras/Del Mero Corazon
Two documentaries by Les Blank about Mexican-Americans in southern Texas. Chulas Fronteras features their music and culture, showing food preparation, family life, dances, fieldwork, and other social activities.  Del Mero Corazon explores the Mexican-American Norteña music tradition, showing various performers in dancehalls and cantinas. (Les Blank, 1976, 85 minutes Public Performance Rights)
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Cinemania
A funny yet mesmerizing documentary that chronicles the lives of five film-obsessed New Yorkers so consumed by their obsession that they neither have jobs nor social lives out of fear that it would impede on their viewing times.  Awards: Hamptons International Film Festival, 2002 - Golden Starfish Jury Award, Best Documentary (Angela Christlieb and Stephen Kuak , 2001, 80 minutes)
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Cinema Verite: Defining the Moment
The cinema verite (or "direct cinema") movement of the 50's and 60's was driven by a group of rebel filmmakers tired of stilted documentaries. They wanted to show life as it really is: raw, gritty, dramatic. Rich in excerpts from verite classics with commentary by filmmakers, this is the first film to capture all the excitement of a revolution that changed movie-making forever, with its influences in everything from TV news to music videos to Webcams. This national Film Board of canada documentary features commentary by: Wolf Koenig, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Kirwan Cox, Peter Wintonick, Francis Miquet, Karel Reisz, Richard Leacock, Albert Maysles, Jean-Pierre Beauviala, Roman Kroitor, Robert Drew, Michel Brault, Jean Rouch, D. A. Pennebaker, William Greaves, Hope Ryden, James Lipscomb, Doug Leiterman, Beryl Fox, Pierre Perrault, Fred Wiseman, Barbara Kopple, Gregg Hale, Robin Cowie, Jennifer Fox, Floria Sigismondi, Terry Macartney-Filgate, Gillian Caldwell. (Peter Wintonick, 1999, 102 minutes)
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Citizen Barnes
Opened in 1925 in Merion, near Philadelphia, the Barnes Foundation houses one of the most prodigious private collections of French painting from the turn of the century. The collection includes 180 Renoirs, 69 Cézannes, and 60 Matisses, along with numerous paintings by Manet, Monet, Degas, van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, Rousseau, Modigliani, Picasso, etc. The film reviews the life and art collecting of Dr. Albert C. Barnes, explains his theories of art, and offers a rare tour of the galleries of Barnes Foundation. (Alain Jaubert, 1993, 57 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Color of Honor
A vivid, collective portrayal of Japanese Americans during World War II. Three distinct stories are told: the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most decorated military unit in U.S. history; M.I.S.(Military Intelligence Service), linguists who decoded Japanese military plans; and the thousands of draft resisters and army protesters who challenged the constitutionality of the internment camps. (Loni Ding, 1989, 90 minutes)
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The Dancing Man, Peg Leg Bates
This documentary profiles Clayton "Peg Leg" Bates, a one-legged dancer who became a vaudeville star and the founder of the largest black-owned resort in the country. (1992, 60 minutes)
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Diamonds in the Rough
Discusses the role of Kenichi Zenimura, the "Dean of the Diamond," in the development of Japanese American baseball, especially at the internment camps during World War II. Narrated by Pat Morita. (Gan Hanada, 1999, 35 minutes)
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Divine Horsemen
This is experimental American filmmaker Maya Deren's look at the fascinating world of the Voudoun religion of Haiti. The viewer attends the rituals of the Rada, Petro, and Congo cults, whose devotees commune with the cosmic powers through invocations - ritual offering, songs and dance. (Maya Deren,  Mystic Fire Video, 1985, 52 minutes)
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Divine Trash
Baltimore director Steve Yeager’s in-depth look at the early career of cult filmmaker John Waters – from his childhood puppet shows to the successful release of Pink Flamingos in 1972 – won the Filmmakers Trophy for Best Documentary at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival. (Steve Yeager, 1998, 105 minutes)
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Dominoes
This documentary uses raw historical footage, without narration, to deliver a visual portrait of the 1960's. The producer has taken 14 vintage 60's rock tunes and matched the lyrics to footage of student riots, Vietnam War, Woodstock, etc. (John Lawrence, 1988, 59 minutes)
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Douglas Coupland: Close Personal Friend
In this video, Coupland (Generation X) discusses life, time and personal identity in the late 20th century.  The video surveys the aural and visual landscape using personal and corporate imagery, and 4000 frames of original graphics.  The pace of the video reflects the information-crammed culture Coupland is discussing.  It's a vibrant, multi-layered exploration of the modern mind, body and soul. (1995, 25 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Drive-In Blues
Combining archival footage with contemporary scenes, this documentary pays homage to the uniquely American institution of the drive-in movie as it explores the development, current status, and future of the drive-in. (1987, 28 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Dwarfs: Not a Fairy Tale
This HBO documentary looks at the lives of four different people with achondroplasia. One is a night watchman at a country inn who would like to have owned a farm, another is a middle school teacher who has a boyfriend who is rather short at under 5 feet, but still 2 feet taller than she is, the third a teenage girl who had limb lengthening surgeries, the fourth is a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Medical Center married to a woman of normal height. (Bonnie Strauss and Lisa Abelow Hedley, 2001, 54 minutes)Check for this item in our catalog

Echoes of America
This is a vibrant account of popular American culture, life, and history, documented in an evocative portrait of the banjo.  The five-string banjo is an original, American musical instrument. (1991, 52 minutes)
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The Family Album
Director Alan Berliner's award-winning documentary presents a picture of American family life from the 1920s to the 1950s. Uses a vast collection of home movies from the period, as well as oral histories and family audio recordings, to show how life was in America during the early part of the century. (Alan Berliner, 1986, 60 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Family Gathering
Tells the story of a third-generation Japanese-American woman's search for her family history and understanding of their internment during the Second World War. Focuses on Masuo Yasui who, after living in the United States for thirty years, was arrested by the FBI as a potentially dangerous alien five days after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. (1989, 30 minutes)
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Forbidden City U.S.A.
Documents the Forbidden City, a San Francisco nightclub of the 1930's and 1940's which featured Chinese Documents the Forbidden City, a San Francisco nightclub of the 1930's and 1940's which featured Chinese American entertainers. Contains film clips of acts at the Forbidden City and interviews with performers and club owner Charlie Low. Originally broadcast on the PBS television series The American Experience. (1989, 57 minutes)
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France: Beneath Paris
Below Paris lies a network of catacombs, waterways, quarries, and other underground areas. The cultural riches of this underground world is revealed. (1998, 25 minutes)
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The Funny Side of Death
A look at death-- from the funeral director's responsibilities to stories about people who were almost buried alive to cemeteries to cyrogenics. (Robert Duncan, 1994, 48 minutes)
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Gap-Toothed Women
Interviews with 40 women, all of whom have a space between their two front teeth. Discussion of their beliefs, lifestyles and whether or not a space between one's teeth makes a difference. (Les Blank, 1987, 30 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Grandma’s Bottle Village: The Art of Tressa Prisbrey (Visions of Paradise series)
THis documentary shows how eighty-four-year-old Tressa Prisbrey scavenged over a million bottles and cemented them together into fifteen houses that contain her collections of pencils, dolls, etc., which she obtained from a nearby dump. (1982, 28 minutes)
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Gao Rang (Grilled Rice)
Details the primitive and violent birth of filmmaking in Vietnam during the wars against the French and later against American-led forces in the 1960s and '70s. North Vietnamese cameramen / soldiers describe their experiences filming in combat, telling about acquiring their first cameras, projecting films along the 17th parallel, their hardships and fears, and their regrets over the "many heroic deaths that were not filmed." (2001, 52 minutes)
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Godzilla Meets Mona Lisa
Looks at the architecture of the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and its unconventional approach to art display. Parisiens and tourists voice favorable and unfavorable opinions as they are shown viewing the museum's modern art collection. In English and French with English subtitles. (1983, 34 minutes)
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Hands On a A Hard Body
A documentary about a contest conducted by the Nissan dealership in Longview, Texas where contestants had to stand straight up with one hand on the “Hard body'” pickup. The last person with a hand on the truck won the vehicle. This technique would later be used in the "elimination phase" of the American television program Survivor. (S. R. Bindler, 1999, 94 minutes)
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I, Doll
A history and examination of the American and international social phenomenon of the Barbie doll, a toy, idol, role model and fashion model reflecting standards of appearance and lifestyle for girls and women since the 1950s. (Tula Asselanis, 1996, 58 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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In Heaven There Is No Beer?
(Video Reserve and 16mm film; has Public Performance Rights
Shows Polish-American polka musicians and polka dancers performing at festivals, dance halls, and small beer halls in the eastern and midwestern parts of the United States. Features the music of Eddie Blazoncyck and the Versatones, the Dick Pillar Orchestra, Renata and Girls, Girls, Girls, and the Mrozinski Brothers. (Les Blank, 1983, 51 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Hell’s Highway: The True Story of Highway Safety Films
A look at the graphic, sometimes violent and gruesome driver's education films that were produced between 1959 and 1979 by a small group in Mansfield, Ohio. The films promoted safety by showing color footage of the consequences of reckless driving. Program also includes interviews with pop culture historians and cult video experts. (Bret Wood, 2003, 91 minutes)
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The Highwaymen: Florida's Outsider Artists
Examines the work of the Florida landscape painters known as the Highwaymen, a group of young, untrained African-American landscape painters. They emerged from the small central Florida town of Fort Pierce in the late 1950's and early 1960's. They were prevented by segregation from selling their paintings in traditional art galleries. So they sold their paintings out of the trunks of their cars, usually for around $35 a painting. They painted on wallboard. In 1995, the Highwaymen became recognized by the art world and their paintings sell for thousands of dollars. The Highwaymen mainly painted Florida back-country scenes, using bold strokes of dramatic colors. (Jack Hambrick, 2002, 58 minutes)
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The Japanese Version
In an attempt to understand modern Japanese culture, this video sets out to explore how Western and specifically American culture is copied and changed in everyday Japanese life. (Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker, 1991, 56 minutes)
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Jupiter’s Wife
This documentary follows a homeless woman in New York's Central Park for two years, trying to uncover the truth behind her cryptic stories. (Michel Negroponte, 1996, 78 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Lies and How To Spot Them

An expert on interpreting facial expressions and body movements shows how to detect if you are being told lies. (47 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Little Castles
This locally produced documentary tells the story of formstone, the distinctively Baltimorean mock stone surface applied to brick buildings, especially row houses. Includes interviews with home owners, manufacturers, architects, preservationists, and filmmaker John Waters. (Skizz Cyzyk and Lillian Bowers, 1999, 29 minutes)
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Mayor Tommy and Nancy
Celebrates the life and political career of the former mayor of Baltimore, Tommy D'Alesandro. This documentary produced by the Mayor's grandson and narrated by the Mayor and his wife and political partner, Nancy Pelosi. (1984, 52 minutes)
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Mazes and Labyrinths
The history and design of mazes and labyrinths are presented. (Scott Campbell, 1996, 28 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Mondo Cane
This Italian "mondo film" (an exploitation documentary genre) presents allegedly real footage of unusual customs, rituals and activities that are considered normal in some places in the world but very odd in others. (Gualtiero Jacopetti, 1962, 105 minutes)
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Monuments To Man
Entertaining tribute to concrete, a humble substance, which build cities, bridges, dams; creates monuments of architecture; and thrills with fantasy. (1992, 52 minutes)
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Mortal Remains
Looks at the evolution of the cemetery from the churchyard to the present day memorial park or lawn cemetery. Practically, it is a space for our dead, but symbolically the cemetery is built for the living. (Chris Gallagher, 2000, 52 minutes)
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Motorcycle Diaries
Follow the on-the-road adventures of Diane Howells and Samantha Schutz as they embark on a journey down the East Coast, filming and interviewing women who love to ride motorcycles. (Diane Howells, 1997, 46 minutes)
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Museum
A behind-the-scenes documentary exploring the real life activity of a museum. Delves into the staff, the operations, fund-raising, and current issues of a major art museum, Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery. (Richard Chisolm, 1979, 30 minutes)
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Musical Holdouts
This film examines the music and lives of Americans who have maintained their ethnic and individual identities in their music. It features performances of musicians from St. John's Island, South Carolina, rural Tennessee, Kentucky, and other southern states, Oklahoma Native American reservations, and California communes and free spirits.
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Mysterious Bee
Documentary on bees, bee behavior and amateur beekeeping.  Includes macro and slow motion photography of the duties of the worker bees, the behavior of the queen bee, and scenes of nearly 12,000 bees crawling all over the legs, arms and face of beekeeper Phil Simon. (Phil Simon, 1981, 48 minutes)
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Not A Lady Among Us
This locally produced documentary traces the history of the woman's exchange movement with particular emphasis on the Woman's Industrial Exchange in Baltimore. The woman's exchange movement, begun in the 19th century, enabled women to help themselves through the dignity of their work. Includes interviews with many long-time employees as well as other historical background. (Lillian Bowers and Matt Pittroff, 2001, 28 minutes)
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Paris Is Burning
A documentary about the young homosexual men of Harlem who originated "voguing" and turned these stylized dance competitions into glittering expressions of fierce personal pride. A story of street-wise urban survival, gay self-affirmation, and the pursuit of a desperate dream. (Jennie Livingston, 1992, 76 minutes)
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People Like Us: Social Class in America
This documentary travels across the country presenting stories of family traditions, class mobility, and different lifestyle choices. It shows how social class plays a role in the lives of all Americans. Features a segment on the "Honfest" in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood. (Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker, 2001, 124 minutes)
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The Perfect Hero
Meet the writers, readers, publishers and the male models who pose for the book covers. They all come together at a conference on board a crusie ship. Experience an insider's look at the business of romance fiction through the eyes of the huge Harlequin empire. (Barbara Doran, 1999, 52 minutes)
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The Powder Room
In this documentary, women reveal to each other the secrets of their emotional lives in the intimacy of all-female spaces, especially public washrooms. (Ann Kennard, 1996, 50 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Real Mr. Ratty
This David Attenborough-narrated episode of the television program Wildlife on One looks at the life-style of the vole. It also describes the physical characteristics, activities, courtship, mating behavior, and rearing of young. Intended audience: Ages 12 through adult. (1979, 30 minutes)
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Rebels: A Journey Underground: The Origins of Cultural Rebellion
From Bohemia and 19th century European romanticism, this film looks back through history to uncover the beginning of "new vision" thinking in Western civilization and its links to what is now called counterculture. 6-video series, 1998, 47 minutes per video. Public Performance Rights.

  1. Society’s Shadow
  2. A New Kind of Bohemian
  3. Turn on the Revolution
  4. A Riot of My Own
  5. Earth Trauma
  6. Welcome to Cyberia

Rebuilding the Temple: Cambodians in America
Details Cambodian Americans who strive to build their temples, hold their religious ceremonies and survive as a culture in the United States. (1991, 61 minutes)
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Red Grooms: Sunflower in a Hothouse
Glimpse into the life and work of artist Red Grooms, an American multimedia artist best known for his colorful pop-art constructions depicting scenes of modern urban lufe. This Academy Award-nominated film (Best Documentary Short) reflects the humor and humanism prevalent in the artist's work. (Thomas L. Neff, 1986, 21 minutes)
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The Regard of Flight
Bill Irwin dances, floats, skips and trips, offering much more than pratfalls and tomfoolery.  Wittily critiques the "new theater". (1987, 59 minutes)
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Ring of Fire (4-volume video series)
This extremely rare documentary series follows the Blair brothers, Lawrence and Lorne, during their 10-year journey through the islands, peoples, and cultures of Indonesia. The title, Ring of Fire, refers to the islands of Indonesia that form a chain of active volcanoes arcing down and around into the Pacific. (Mystic Fire Video)

  1. Spice Island Saga - In this episode, the Blair brothers sail with the Bugis tribe on a 2,000 mile journey through the Spice Islands in search of the golden-tailed Bird of Paradise. The trips also starts the brothers on an inner journey that leads them ever deeper into the wisdom of the island peoples. (Video, 1988, 58 minutes) Check for this item in our catalog
  2. Dance of the Warriors - In this episode, the Blair Brothers sail to Komodo to vist the people there, descendents of those banished by the sultans of Bima to the "Dragon Island." There they also film the giant lizards, then move on to Sumba where they witness a veiled form of human sacrifice, and master weavers at work. The Sumbanese still live by ancient beliefs, keeping a balance between the gods of the sky and the goddess of the world below. Then the brothers move 5,000 years into the past to live with Asmat headhunters in New Guinea, and eventually reach Bali. (Video, 1988, 58 minutes) Check for this item in our catalog
  3. East of Krakatoa - In Java, the Blairs descend from the crater of a new volcano, "Child of Krakatoa", to a world of medieval courts, puppet plays, forgers of magical swords, healers with supernatural powers and whole communities ruled by spirits. Then in Bali they meet with sages, and the Toraja people of the Celebes highlands, a tribe that believes its ancestors came from the stars in skyships. (Video, 1988, 58 minutes) Check for this item in our catalog
  4. Dream Wanderers of Borneo - In Borneo, the Blair Brothers travel 800 miles through rainforest to find the last of the Punan Dyaks, a tribe believed extinct. When they do, in fact, find them, the brothers are initiated into the spiritual mysteries of the "dream wanderers" and tattooed with the symbol of Aping-"the tree of all life.” (Video, 1988, 58 minutes) Check for this item in our catalog 

Route 40
Route 40 explores a day and a night in this gritty slice of American life, visiting those whose lives revolve around this road. (1986, 58 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Screen Painters
This locally produced documentarty discusses a unique art, screen painting, which is not seen anywhere else in the United States except Baltimore. Talks about William A. Oktavec who is the founder of this art in Baltimore and some other screen painters including Tom Lipka, Johnny Eck and Ben Richardson. (Elaine Eff, 1988, 29 minutes)
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Sexual Encounters of the Floral Kind
Documentary on reproduction in plants and especially on the various forms of pollination. (1980, 53 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Sherman’s March: A Meditation on the Possibility of Romantic Love in the South During an Era of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation
Director Ross McElwee sets out to make a documentary about the lingering effects of General Sherman's march of destruction through the South during the Civil War, but is continually sidetracked by women who come and go in his life, his recurring dreams of nuclear holocaust, and Burt Reynolds. (Ross McElwee, 1986, 157 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Tao of the Dumpster
Examines the meaning of success and freedom, as defined by Burt Jamison, who gave up working as a contractor, choosing instead to spend his time gathering food from dumpsters.  This change of life cost Burt his marriage, but helped him discover his "Tao". (1996, 30 minutes)
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The Ten Year Lunch: The Wit and legend of the Algonquin Round Table
From 1919 to 1929 in New York City's Algonquin Hotel, a group of poets, novelists, playwrites, critics, humorists and editors met each day to exchange opinions, gossip and the most cutting wit of the day. (1987, 60 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Top Hat & Tales: Harold Ross and the Making of the New Yorker
This documentary shows how Harold Ross, a high school dropout and miner's son from Colorado, started the sophisticated New Yorker magazine. (Adam Van Doren, 2001, 47 minutes)
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The Trial of the Catonsville Nine
Presents a performance of the play by Daniel Berrigan about nine anti-war activists who burned draft records during the Vietnam War as a protest of the war's morality. Includes an interview with Barbara Jensen, the producer of the play. Produced by Marie Lehnert and Fil Sibley. (1980, 120 minutes)
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The Trials of Telo Rinpoche
Explores the revival of Tibetan Buddhism in the Russian republic of Kalmykia through the efforts of a young Philadelphia native and son of Kalmykian emigrants. He has become a monk through study in India and finds his current position as co-chair of Kalmykia's religious affairs department a daunting assignment. He's shown working with government officials and visiting the Dalai Lama in India, his family in Philadelphia, and locations where he plans to build new Buddhist learning institutions in Kalmykia. (1994, 50 minutes)
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Twist
Director Ron Mann (Comic Book Confidential, Grass) vintage film clips and interviews with rock and roll musicians and dancers to trace the history of popular dancing in the 1950s and early 1960s. (Ron Mann, 1993, 78 minutes)
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Underground
This film by Emile de Antonio, Mary Lampson and Haskell Wexler introduces each member of the "Weathermen" in a group discussion/interview made on May 1st, 1975 in a secret location. The era of the 60's and 70's is vividly bought to life by interweaving the stories of the "Weathermen's " personal political development with the significant events and personalities of the two decades. (1976, 88 minutes)
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Up Close and Personal: The Ecology of David Suzuki
Using 3-D animation, time lapse, infra-red, and macro photography, this documentary takes us on an exploration of the invisible life that surrounds us. As we watch David Suzuki go about his daily life, much as anyone else would, we see that millions of bacteria, yeasts and mites flourish on every inch of his skin. (Caroline Underwood, 1998, 48 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Uprising of '34
This films tells the story of the General Strike of 1934, a massive but little-known strike by hundreds of thousands of southern textile workers.  After three weeks the strike was stopped, the strikers denied jobs.  Sixty years later this strike is virtually unknown, and union representation in the South still suspect. (1995, 87 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Unquiet Death of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
Examines the many unanswered questions surrounding the Rosenburg-Sobell case.  Charged by the U.S. government with conspiracy to commit "atomic espionage", the Rosenbergs were found guilty and executed on June 19, 1953.  The film proposes that the Rosenberg case was the first step toward government policies which made possible the exploits of the CIA, U.S intervention in Vietnam, and the dirty tricks of Watergate. (1975, 90 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Varmints
Officially declared a "varmint", the prairie dog may be hunted with no restrictions as to season, method, or number of animals taken. This documentary examines the prairie dog's role as a keystone species in the grasslands of the northern plains states. Ecologists, hunters, ranchers, and others are interviewed. Archival footage shows the U.S. government's official eradication policy of the 1930's. The contemporary sport of varmint hunting is presented. (Doug Hawes-Davis, 1998, 91 minutes)
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Weapons of the Spirit
The story of a village in France, Le Chambon-sur-Lignon, that took in and sheltered 5000 Jews from Nazis, as told by Jewish filmmaker, Sauvage, who was himself born and protected in that defiantly peaceful community. (Pierre Sauvage, 1988, 91 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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When the Lights Go Out: Cockroaches, a Domestic History
A mixture of macro photography, dramatization and animation provides an intimate look at the anatomy and the life cycle of the domestic cockroach, and into the organization of its society. Also explores the relationship between cockroaches and human society. (1994, 28 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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Yeah You Rite!
The English language as spoken in New Orleans has been influenced by the city's rich and varied history, leaving it with dozens of unique words and phrases that all New Orleanians understand but which frequently baffle visitors. (Louis Alvarez and Andrew Kolker, 1985, 29 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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You Don't Know Dick
Portraits of six men who once were women through their commentaries and the experiences of partners, friends, and family. (1997, 58 minutes, Public Performance Rights)
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The Young and the Dead
The program tells the story of how the Hollywood Memorial Cemetery became Hollywood Forever. A metamorphosis from decrepit burial ground to a modern, interactive, state-of-art facility, with touch-screen kiosks and a gift shop complete with souvenirs. And how a cemetery became according to LA magazine, one of the sexiest places in LA. (Robert Pulcini, 2000, 90 minutes)
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