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Sights and Sounds Department Collection and State Library Resources

Classic Feature Films on 16mm

The Sights & Sounds Department owns a number of classic feature films in its 16mm film collection. While many of these titles are available in video and DVD format, they do not come with automatic "public performance rights" for screenings. Because all of our 16mm films have public performance rights - meaning they can be shown at free public screenings without having to get clearance from the copyright owners - this makes them an ideal programming option to consider when planning a community film event or series. Some collection highlights are listed below.

Abraham Lincoln (1930)
dir. D.W. Griffith

This Academy-Award-winning film story about Abraham Lincoln's life emphasizes the man rather than the statesman. Story adaptation, continuity and dialogue by Stephen Vincent Benet and Garrit Lloyd. With Walter Huston, Una Merkle, Ian Keith. (USA, 1930, 85 minutes, b&w, silent)
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Alexander Nevsky (1938)
dir. Sergei Eisenstein and D.I. Vassiliev

 

 

Sergei M. Eisenstein's epic film of the invasion of Russia in 1242 by the Teutonic Knights. Sweeping across the Baltic states, they were met by the people of the free city-state of Novgorod under their prince, Alexander Nevsky. At Lake Peipus the fierce and decisive Battle of the Ice was fought and Alexander Nevsky won a brilliant victory. Story by Sergei Eisenstein and Peter A. Pavlenko; photography by Edouard Tisse; music by Sergei Prokofiev. Cast,: Nikolai Cherkassov, N. P. Okhlopkov, and A. L. Abrikossov. (USSR, 1938, 107 minutes, b&w, Iinn Russian with English subtitles).
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Algiers (1938)
dir. John Cromwell

Romantic drama of life in Algier's Casbah. In this Hollywood version of Julian Pepe le Moko, well-liked criminal who has taken refuge in the Casbah falls in love with a beautiful tourist. Cast: Charles Boyer, Sigrid Gurie, Hedy Lamarr. (USA, 1938, 95 minutes, b&w)
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Alphaville (1965)
dir. Jean-Luc Godard

In this exciting blend of crime thriller and sci-fi drama set in 1984, tough American detective Lemmy Caution (Eddie Constantine) is sent from Earth across the galaxay to destroy Alpha 60, the supercomputer that runs Alphaville, a dictatorial state where love and poetry are banned. This futuristic fantasy is a study of alienation in a technological society. Cast: (France, 1965, 100 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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Antonio Das Mortes (1969)
dir. Glauber Rocha

This example of Brazil's Cinema Novo is a folk-epic period piece about a Brazil that no longer exists. And this 16mm copy is one of the few prints that exist of a film that is domestically unavailable on video or DVD. The movie, also known as O Dragão da Maldade contra o Santo Guerreiro,  is the sequel to God and the Devil in the Land of the Sun (Deus e o diabo na terra do sol), and takes place 29 years after Antonio das Mortes (Mauricio do Valle) killed Corisco (the "Blond Devil"), last of the Cangaceiros. In "the old days", Antonio's function in life was exterminate these bandits, on account of his personal grudges against them. His life had been meaningless for the last 29 years, but now, a new challenge awaits him. When a Cangaceiro appears in Jardim Das Piranhas, the local Land Baron (Jofre Soares), an old man, does what seems obvious to him: he calls Antonio das Mortes, killer of Cangaceiros. At first, Antonio is ecstatic. His life has gained new meaning. But soon it becomes obvious that this new Cangaceiro (named Coirana) is no Corisco, but an idealist. An idealist of the sixties in the garb of the forties. A leader to the hopeless and the hungry. Antonio das Mortes begins to reconsider his feelings towards Coirana and his followers. Music by Marlos Nobre and the Folk Group of Minas. In Portuguese with English subtitles. Awards: Glauber Rocha won Best Director at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival and Antonio Das Mortes was nominated for the Golden Palm at Cannes the same year. (Brazil, 1969, 100 minutes, color, in Portuguese with English subtitles)
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As You Like It (1939)
dir. Paul Czinner

Based on Shakespeare's romantic comedy about star-crossed lovers Orlando and Rosalind. Music by William Walton, performed by the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Cast: Laurence Olivier, Elisabeth Berger. (UK, 1936, 96 minutes, b&w)
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At War With the Army (1951)
dir. Hal Walker

Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis star in this comedy of two pals in civilian life who join the army. Martin plays a singing and skirt-chasing sergeant to Lewis' bungling private. Cast: Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Polly Bergen. (USA, 1951, 92 minutes, b&w)
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The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1974)
dir. John Korty

Presents the story of the long life of Miss Jane Pittman, who began her life as a slave in the South and who marched for her civil rights in the 20th century at the age of 110. Based on the book of the same title by Ernest J. Gaines. With Cicely Tyson as Miss Pittman. Director, John Korty; writer, Tracy Keenan Wynn. (USA, 120 minutes, color)
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The Bailiff (Sansho Dayu) (1954)
dir. Kenji Mizoguchi

In 11th century Japan, a mother and her two children set off to find her husband who has been in exile. The family is broken up and the brother and sister are sold as slaves to Sansho, a cruel bailiff in a distant region. (Japan, 1954, 120 minutes, b&w, in Japanese with English subtitles)
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Band of Outsiders (1964)
dir. Jean-Luc Godard

Two bumbling burglars plan a robbery with a young woman they just met. Problems begin immediately when they both fall for the girl and the plan goes haywire. The jewel-heist plot is merely a jumping off point for Godard's fast paced mix of fantasy and spoof of Hollywood crime films. Scenario by Jean Luc Godard, based on Fool's Gold by Delores Hitchens. Cast: Anna Karina, Sami Frey, Claude Brasseur. (France, 1964, 95 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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Battleship Potemkin (1925)
dir. Sergei Eisenstein

Dramatically depicts the events which surrounded the mutiny aboard a Russian warship during the 1905 uprising. Contains the famous Odessa Steps sequence, frequently cited as a classic example of the use of montage. English intertitles. SILENT FILM. (USSR, 1925, 62 minutes, b&w)
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The Bicycle Thief (Bicycle Thieves, Ladri de Bicilette) (1948)
dir. Vittoria De Sica



An unemployed man in Rome finds a job as a municipal bill poster, for which he must have a bicycle. But his bike is stolen, and he searches in vain for the robber and bike, losing his son in the process. In the end he, too, steals a bicycle. Received an Honorary Academy Award for outstanding foreign film released in United States in 1949. Cast: Lamberto Maggiorani, Lianella Carnel, Enzo Staiola. In Italian with English subtitles. (Italy, 1948, 90 minutes, b&w)
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The Birth of a Nation (1915)
dir. D.W. Griffith

This is the controversial film that was banned in many parts of the world. Although noted for its advances in cinematic art (dramatic use of natural settings, cross cutting, sophisticated editing), the film is considered to be an example of ultraracist propaganda, particularly for its scenes covering the post-Civil War Reconstruction Period. Based on the novel The Clansman by Rev. Thomas Dixon, the story concerns a Southern family during the Civil War whose various members are caught up on opposite sides of the struggle. Cast: With Walthall, Mae Marsh, Lillian Gish, Wallace Reid, Donald Crisp, Marian Cooper, Eugene Pallette. (USA, 1915, 100 minutes, b&w, silent)
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Blackmail (1929)
dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Made first as a silent but later released as Britain's first sound film, this is one of the best of the early sound films and notable for Alfred Hitchcock's subjective, imaginative use of sound to emphasize the drama of images. In this mystery-suspense tale a detective's girl friend kills in self-defense an artist who tries to rape her. A blackmailer tries to force the detective to cooperate with him. However, the detective contrives to make the police suspect the blackmailer who is killed in a spectacular chase on the roof of the British Museum. Cast: Anny Ondra, John Longden, Sara Allgood, Donald Calthorp, Cyril Ritchard. (UK, 1929, 88 minutes, b&w)
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Block-Heads (1938)
dir. Hal Roach

A World War I veteran finds that his war buddy is in a soldier's home and so out of touch he doesn't even know the war is over. A comedy featuring Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. (USA, 1938, 75 minutes, b&w)
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Blood of the Condor (Yawar Mallku) (1969)
dir. Jorge Sanjines



A much-awarded, controversial film about the actual events of a U.S. sponsored effort to sterilize Quechua Indian women in Bolivia. An uprising by one Indian leads to the kidnapping and castration of the doctors by the outraged husbands of the village. Ironically their leader himself is later shot and dies because he can receive no medical treatment without advance payment to the hospital. In Quechua and Spanish with English subtitles. (Bolivia, 1969, 85 minutes, b&w)
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Breathless (A Bout de Souffle) (1959)
dir. Jean-Luc Godard

An amoral young Frenchman has patterned his character after Humphrey Bogart's screen image, taking what he wants when he wants it. He has an affair with an American expatriate who betrays him to the police, and he is finally shot down. Script by Godard from a story by Francois Truffaut. Cast: Jean-Paul Belmundo, Jean Seberg. (France, 1959, 89 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919)
dir. Robert Weine

The story of a mad somnambulist who commits murder in a small town, and the strange occurences which take place at the mental asylum to which he is traced. One of the most famous of experimental films, it has been praised by some for its use of unrealistic settings to portray psychological anguish, and condemned by others as an example of post-World War I decadence and as doubtful decorative art. With Werner Krauss and Conrad Veidt. Directed by Robert Weine. Edited version with piano background added, 1950. (Germany, 1919, 50 minutes, b&w, silent)
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Citizen Kane (1941)
dir. Orson Welles

This is Orson Welles' cinematic masterpiece and a feature film which exhibits almost all the important techniques of film making ... in direction, camera work, editing, and screenplay. The story involves Charles Foster Kane, a mogul of journalism publishing, whose meteoric career is described from birth to death. Cited as among the 12 Best Films of All Time at Brussels in 1958. Music by Bernard Hermann. Cast: Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Dorothy Comingore, Agnes Moorehead, Ruth Warwick, Everett Sloane, George Coulouris, Ray Collins. (USA, 1941, 119 minutes, b&w)
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City Lights (1931)
dir. Charles Chaplin

In this bittersweet tragi-comedy, Charlie Chaplin as an umemployed man falls in love with a blind flower girl who mistakes him for a millionaire. Charlie becomes involved with an eccentric millionaire, who is generous when drunk but mean when sober. After trying to earn money first as a street sweeper and then as a boxer, Charlie takes a large sum of money to enable the blind girl to have an operation to regain her sight. He is arrested and, upon his release from prison, finds the blind girl has been cured. Director, writer, and music, Charles Chaplin. Cast: Charlie Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill and Harry Myers. (USA, 1931, 81 minutes, b&w)
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Le Corbeau (1943)
dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot


A mysterious character assassin has the goods on everybody in a small French town and sends them poison pen letters to whip them into a frenzy against the local physician and each other. This thriller evokes an atmosphere in which petty malevolence is cherished and paranoia becomes commonplace. Cast: Pierre Fresnay, Pierry Larquey, Ginette Leclerc. (France, 1943, 92 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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David Copperfield (1934)
dir. George Cukor

An abridged version of the feature length film starring Freddie Bartholomew as Charles Dickens's character in the novel about life in 18th-century England. With Lionel Barrymore, Basil Rathbone, W.C. Fields, and Edna Mae Oliver. (USA, 1934, 82 minutes, b&w)
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David and Lisa (1962)
dir. Frank Perry

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Shot in Philadelphia on a low budget, this film has been widely acclaimed for its psychological insights into the minds of emotionally disturbed teenagers, as well as the problems that face all adolescents. (USA, 1962, 95 minutes, b&w)
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D.O.A. (1950)
dir. Rudolph Mate


Frank Bigelow, a real-estate salesman, is accidentally given a slow-acting, lethal poison.  In the few hours left to him, he frantically seeks to learn who is responsible and why he was poisoned. Cast: Edmond O'Brien, Pamela Britton, Luther Adler, Neville Brand, Beverly Campbell, William Ching. (USA, 1950, 83 minutes, b&w)
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Drifting Weeds (Floating Weeds) (Ukigusa) (1959)
dir. Yasujiro Ozu

A sensitive exploration of human feelings done in a restrained style with exquisite cinematography.  Tells the story of an itinerant actor in a failing Kabuki troupe, a woman whom he is visiting for the first time in twelve years, and their son who first learns his father's identity. Cast: Ganjiro Nakamura, Machiko Kyo, Ayako Wakao, Hiroshi Kawaguchi, Haruko Sugimura, Hitomi Nozoe, Chishu Ryu, Hirotsugu Mitsui. (Japan, 1959, 120 minutes, b&w, in Japanese with English subtitles)
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Drunken Angel (1948)
dir. Akira Kuroswa

The story of a physician who tries to be a healer in a world of hoodlums. Cat: Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura, Reizaburo Yamamoto. (Japan, 1948, 102 minutes, b&w)
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The Earrings of Madame De (1954)
dir. Max Ophuls

Tragic misunderstandings arise when a society wife sells her earrings and tells her husband she has lost them. Cast: Charles Boyer, Danielle Darrieux, Vittorio De Sica. (Max Ophuls, France, 1954, 105 minutes, b&w)
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Enthusiasm (Entuziazm: Symphony of the Donbas) (1930)
dir. Dziga Vertov

 

Made to show how the miners of the Don Coal Basin were able to fulfill, in four years, their part in the Soviet's Five-Year Plan. Writer, director, editor, Dziga Vertov. (USSR, 74 minutes, b&w, in Russian with English subtitles)
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The Exterminating Angel (1962)
dir. Luis Bunuel

The guests at a high society dinner party find it absolutely impossible to go home. A mysterious and surreal portrait of corruption and decadence in the ruling class. ( )
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Fallen Idol (1949)
dir. Carol Reed

When a lonely young boy is left in the care of the family butler, he sees both the butler's secret love affair and the accidental death of the butler's wife. Believing the butler murdered his wife, the boy tries to protect him but only involves him more deeply with the police. Director, Carol Reed; screenplay, Graham Greene from his story "The Basement Room." Cast: Ralph Richardson, Bobby Henry, Jack Hawkins. (Carol Reed, UK, 1949, 96 minutes, b&w)
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Falstaff (Chimes At MIdnight) (1965)
dir. Orson Welles

Chimes at Midnight (aka Falstaff) is a 1965 Spanish-French-Swiss co-production directed by Orson Welles that is based on the Shakespeare character Sir John Falstaff. The script contains text from five Shakespeare plays: primarily Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2, but also Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor. The film's narration, spoken by Ralph Richardson, is taken from the chronicler Holinshed. The cast includes Welles himself as Falstaff, Keith Baxter as Hal, Sir John Gielgud as Henry IV, Jeanne Moreau as Doll Tearsheet, and Margaret Rutherford as Mistress Quickly.

Along with The Trial, Welles considered this his best work, saying "If I wanted to get into heaven on the basis of one movie, that's the one I'd offer up." Many critics, including Peter Bogdanovich and Jonathan Rosenbaum, consider it Welles's finest work and one of the best-ever Shakespeare film adaptations. The gory Battle of Shrewsbury scene in particular has been widely admired, serving as inspiration for movies like Braveheart and Saving Private Ryan. But due to complications concerning the film's ownership, Welles' classic remains unavailable in the United States; it is currently available only as an import DVD from Brazil.

Awards: In 1966, Welles was nominated for the Golden Palm Award at the Cannes Film Festival and won that festival's 20th Anniversary Prize and the Technical Grand Prize. In Spain, the film won the 1966 Citizens Writers Circle Award for Best Film and in 1968 Welles was nominated for the UK's BAFTA film award as Best Foreign Actor. (Orson Welles, 1965, Spain-France-Switzerland, 115 minutes, b&w, 16mm)
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A Farewell To Arms (1933)
dir. Frank Borzage

This classic filmed version of Hemingway's tale of love, war, and honor dramatizes the story of the bittersweet romance between Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an Americn serving with the Italian ambulance corp in World War I and Catherine Barkley an English nurse. Cast: Gary Cooper, Helen Hayes, Jack Larue, and Adolph Menjou. (USA, 1933, 79 minutes, b&w)
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Fires On the Plain (1959)
dir. Kon Ichikawa


Japanese antiwar film about a soldier lost from his command. He joins several other soldiers who are cannibals. When he tries to surrender to the Americans, he is shot. (Japan, 1959, 105 minutes, in Japanese with English subtitles, b&w)
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Foreign Correspondent (1940)
dir. Alfred Hitchcock

An Alfred Hitchcock classic about an American journalist who tries to track down a European spy ring. Cast: Joel McCrea, Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Edmund Gwenn, Robert Benchley. (USA, 1940, 118 minutes, b&w)
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The Freshman (1925)
dir. Fred Newmeyer and Sam Taylor

Harold Lloyd burlesques a deserving young college student with athletic aspirations and spoofs the popularity of football and sophisticated collegiate life in the 1920's. Football game shot at the Berkeley Bowl during the East-West game in the winter of 1924-25. Sound effects and a musical sound track have been added to the original silent film. (1925, 75 minutes, silent, b&w)
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The General (1927)
dir. Clyde Bruckman and Buster Keaton

  

A young man, rejected by the Confederate Army for military service, becomes the engineer on a locomotive known as The General. He soon finds the action he has been seeking when Union forces try to steal The General. This version includes a musical sound track added to the silent film. Writers and directors, Buster Keaton and Clyde Bruckman. Starring Buster Keaton as the young man. (USA, 1927, 77  minutes, b&w, silent)
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Hallulujah, I'm a Bum
dir. Lewis Milestone

A musical satire set in New York City during the Great Depression based on original story by Ben Hecht. This surreal fable on the virtues of idleness stars Al Jolson as Bumper, a self-made bum and honorary Mayor of Central Park. Bumper saves the girl friend of the real Mayor of New York from committing suicide. She suffers amnesia and Bumper falls in love with her, and gets a respectable job only to go back to his old way of life when she regains her memory and is reunited with the Mayor. Musical score includes the songs, "You Are Too Beautiful" and "I'll Do It Again." With Madge Evans, Frank Morgan, Edgar Connor, Harry Langdon, and Chester Conklin. Writer, S.N. Behrman; music and lyrics, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. (USA, 1933, 83 minutes, b&w)
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Hiroshima Mon Amour (1959)
dir. Alain Hiroshima
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It's a Wonderful Life (1947)
dir. Frank Capra



In this ultimately optimistic comedy-drama, Clarence, an angel second-class, is sent to earth to convince George Bailey that life is worth living. After they review George's life, with all its victories, defeats, and unfulfilled dreams, Clarence shows George what would have happened in Bedford Falls had he never been born. Clarence wins his wings and George realizes the importance of each man in the lives he touches. Cast: James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore, and Henry Traver. (USA, 129 minutes, b&w)
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Ivan the Terrible, Part 1 (1944)
dir. Sergei Eisenstein

This film was the beginning of Sergei Eisenstein's last project. Intending to make a three-part epic biography of Czar Ivan IV, he hoped to offer a comprehensive vision of Ivan's personality, showing his inner struggle as well as his struggle against the enemies of his country. Part I begins with Ivan's coronation; shows his struggle through military victory to unite Russian lands. When he falls seriously ill, he goes into seclusion; his wife is murdered by an ambitious boyar and Ivan, vowing to destroy all his enemies, soon rallies massive support against the boyars. Cinematography by Edouard Tisse and Andrei Moskvin. Music by Sergei Prokofiev. With Nikolai Cherkassov as Ivan IV. (Sergei Eisenstein, USSR, 1944, 97 minutes, b&w, in Russian with English subtitles)
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Ivan the Terrible Part 2 (1946)
dir. Sergei Eisenstein

 

Part II begins with a summarization of Ivan's self-imposed exile in Alexandrovsky. Upon his return to Moscow, weary of war and internal strife, he is accused by his best friend of being responsible for the murder of a group of boyars. Not guilty of the deed, Ivan is outraged and declares that he will indeed become "Ivan the Terrible." When he learns that his aunt is plotting to murder him, he devises a scheme where she accidently kills her own son during a banquet. This scene filmed in color was the only color sequence in Eisentein's career. Ivan manages to retain his power but treachery and executions are rampant. Cinematography by Edouard Tisse and Andrei Moskvin. Music by Sergei Prokofiev. With Nikolai Cherkassov as Ivan IV. (Sergei Eisenstein, USSR, 1946, 87 minutes, b&w, in Russian with English subtitles)
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Le Million (1931)
dir. Rene Clair

The hero of this rollicking comedy wins a large sum in the lottery just as he is completely down and out. But the coat in which he hid the lottery ticket is stolen and sold by a beggar. Thus begins a madcap chase eventually involving crowds of people throughout Paris. (France, 1931, 80 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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L'Eclisse (1962)
dir. Michelangelo Antonioni

A beautiful young Roman is tormented by existential despair. She breaks off a romance with her lover and shortly afterwards drifts, at first unwillingly, into another affair with her mother's energetic young stockbroker. Cast: Alain Delon, Monica Vitti, Francisco Rabal. (Italy, 1962, 123 minutes, b&w, in Italian with English subtitles)
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Les Diaboliques (1955)
dir. Henri-Georges Clouzet

In this mystery drama, a school headmaster's wife and mistress join forces to kill him. After the murder, the wife's guilt and a number of mysterious happenings torture her. Music, Georges Auric. Director, Henri-Georges Clouzot. Cast: Simone Signoret, Vera Clouzot, Charles Vanel. (FRance, 1955, 105 minutes, b&w, in French with English subtitles)
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Limelight (1952)
dir. Charles Chaplin

Charles Chaplin is the author, producer and director of this film about a once-great English music hall entertainer who has gone to seed but manages to inspire a young dancer with courage and hope. Includes rollicking vaudeville skits, such as a burlesque violin-piano concert with Buster Keaton at the piano. Cast: Charlie Chaplin, Claire Bloom, Nigel Bruce, Sydney Chaplin, Andre Eglevsky, Melissa Hayden. (USA, 1952, 145 minutes, b&w)
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Los Olvidados (The Forgotten Ones) (1949)
Luis Bunuel

This film about the forgotten children of Mexico City seeks to demonstrate that adolescents already on a social margin soon turn into delinquents. In disadvantageous social conditions, their re-education is a joust against windmills. Cast: Estela Juda, Robert Cobo. (Mexico, 1950, 88 minutes, b&w, in Spanish with English subtitles)
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The Magician (1958)
dir. Ingmar Bergman

The supernatural, comic, mystical and human mingle in this tale of a magician and his troupe who are detained in a small Swedish community when their magical powers are disbelieved. Cast: Max von Sydow, Ingrid Thulin, Bibi Andersson. (Sweden, 1958, 102 minutes, b&w, in Swedish with English subtitles)
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Man with a Movie Camera (1929)
dir. Dziga Vertov

An experimental Soviet silent documentary about daily life in which the director identifies the camera lens with the human eye which can go everywhere, see anything. The result is a dizzying cinematic experience that takes the viewer climbing up buildings, along steel girders, peering under and over trains. Contains examples of many other techniques, such as superimpositions, split screens, stroboscopic editing. Director and writer, Dziga Vertov. (USSR, 1929, 67 minutes, b&w, silent)
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Masculine Feminine (1966)
dir. Jean-Luc Godard

Literary lion-wannabe Jean-Pierre Léaud chases budding yé yé star Chantal Goya, then gets a job as an unlikely opinion pollster. A portrait of youth and sex, with the story repeatedly interrupted: a woman blows away her husband; a scene in the Métro paraphrased from LeRoi Jones’ Dutchman; Brigitte Bardot rehearsing in a bistro; a Swedish artfilm-cum-sexfilm-within-a-film, etc., topped by Léaud’s probing off-camera questioning of “Miss Nineteen.” (France, 1966, 103 minutes, b&w)
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Meet John Doe (1941)
dir. Frank Capra


In this social-comedy-drama, Gary Cooper plays an unemployed man picked as the "typical American," John Doe, by a newspaper publisher for the sake of a newspaper stunt. He is soon built into the symbol of the average man by the high-pressure campaign of the news mogul (Edward Arnold), with the aid of a girl reporter (Barbara Stanwyck), until he learns he is being used to further the publisher's political ambitions. Director, Frank Capra; screenplay, Robert Riskin; photographer, George Barnes; music, Dimitri Tiomkin. (USA, 1941, 122 minutes, b&w)
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The Trial (1962)
 dir. Orson Welles

Trial

Based on a Kafka allegory about a man who is arrested in a totalitarian society for a crime that is never explained to him, this adaptation is set largely in a cavernous deserted railway station resembling a kind of antechamber to Hell. Director, screenwriter, editor, Orson Welles. Cast: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, Anthony Perkins, Akim Tamiroff, Romy Schneider. Dubbed into English. (1962, 119 minutes, b&w)
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Yojimbo (1961)
dir. Akira Kurosawa


With the fall in the 19th century of Japan's feudal lords, samurai suddenly find that their services are no longer in demand. One of their number, Sanjuro, arrives at a village and finds it split into two warring camps. Taking sides, he does not rest until he has killed all his enemies. (Japan, 1961, 110 minutes, b&w, in Japanese with English subtitles )
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