Showing category: Pro-Southern Activity in Maryland (see recent posts)
Major General Wallace has issued an order...

Valley Register (Middletown), August 26, 1864, p.2

On Monday evening, John Hagan, living on the Western turnpike three miles from Frederick, was arrested...

Valley Register (Middletown), August 1, 1864, p.2

Chas. V. Sepper and G. G. Walters, members of the 1st Md. (rebel) Infantry, were captured on the north side of the Potomac river near Harper's Ferry...

Valley Register (Middletown), June 24, 1864, p.2

On Saturday evening, the 21st inst., a most important capture was made by Col. Woolley's detectives.

Cecil County Whig (Elkton), May 28, 1864, p.1

The gentlemen from Delaware and from Somerset county, Maryland, who were brought to this city and lodged in the military prison several days since, on various charges of disloyalty, are still in prison awaiting an examination of their cases.

Baltimore Sun, May 6, 1864, p.1

Think of It.  We trust there is no loyal man in this county so blind to his own and his State's interests that he can be induced to stay away from the polls next Wednesday...

Cecil Whig (Elkton), April 2. 1864, p.2

The Rev. Mr. M. Hinkle, Methodist Episcopal minister (pastor of a church in Baltimore county), was arrested by the government detectives last Saturday....
Valley Register (Middletown), January 29, 1864, p.2.

Through the connivance and treachery of the Copperhead Democracy of Ohio, the notorious horse thief, gambler, and rebel Major John Morgan....

Annapolis Gazette, December 3, 1863, p. 3.

To-day has been set aside by the Governor of the State and the President of the United States as a day of thanksgiving, and will generally be observed....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, November 26, 2013, Front Page.

There has been a bill introduced by Mr. Bingham of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, offering aid to the State of Maryland for the abolishment of slavery. Mr. Thomas, of Maryland, also introduced a resolution....

The Cecil Whig (Elkton), January 24, 1863, p. 2.

The commissioners to examine the cases of the State prisoners have finished their labors at Fort Warren. Of twenty-nine State prisoners....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, May 17, 1862, p. 3.

R.H. Bigger, Esq., of this city, who has a commission of captain in the Confederate army, has been released from Fort Warren upon his parole not to correspond with the enemies of the United States or to go South....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, May 10, 1862, p. 2.

A little rebel flag was hoisted on the Union flag-staff at Fox Chase, a short time since, by attaching the contraband to the halyard, cutting the cord and then drawing the diminutive emblem of treason....

The Cecil Whig (Elkton), March 22, 1862, p. 2.

The rebel ladies of Elkton are offering gingerbread and cider as an inducement to Union beaux. It won't do, ladies, Rebeldom is a dreary old place to inhabit. 'Tis getting very uncomfortable, no doubt, out there in the cold; but ginger cakes and hard cider won't purchase redemption....

The Cecil Whig (Elkton), February 1, 1862, p.2.

Ignorant as we are of the plans of the Government in regard to our unhappy difficulties, we are not disposed to find fault with it for what seems to us to be unpardonable blindness....

The Annapolis Gazette, August 8, 1861, p.2.

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