Showing category: Baltimore (see recent posts)
The Mayor addressed the following communications to the city council last evening..

Baltimore Sun, November 1, 1864, p.1

Quite an interesting and novel case occurred at Major Blumenberg's office on Friday night last...

Baltimore Sun, October 31, 1864, p.1

Wm. Davis was arrested yesterday, charged with disloyalty.

Baltimore Sun, September 29, 1864, p.1

The following ordinance has passed both branches of the city council:

Baltimore Sun, September 16, 1864, p.2

A picture in a late number of Harper's Weekly, representing Gen. Warren rallying the Marylanders, allows an inference prejudicial to the Maryland troops in this corps.

Baltimore Sun, June 11, 1864, p.2

The following persons from this place and vicinity have volunteered in the one hundred days service...

Valley Register (Middletown), June 3, 1864, p.3

On Saturday evening, the 21st inst., a most important capture was made by Col. Woolley's detectives.

Cecil County Whig (Elkton), May 28, 1864, p.1

The draft having been completed in the second and third congressional districts, the examination of the drafted men will now proceed as rapidly as possible...

Baltimore Sun, May 20, 1864, p.1

The gentlemen from Delaware and from Somerset county, Maryland, who were brought to this city and lodged in the military prison several days since, on various charges of disloyalty, are still in prison awaiting an examination of their cases.

Baltimore Sun, May 6, 1864, p.1

The Second Maryland Regiment - Complimentary Reception.

Baltimore Sun, April 14, 1864, p.1 

Major General Lew Wallace yesterday took command of the Middle Department Headquarters at Baltimore.

Annapolis Gazette, March 24, 1864, p.1

Charles W. Webster, of Westminster, Carroll county, Md., who was captured seven months ago, during Gen. Lee's invasion of Maryland, arrived in this city on Sunday last...
Weekly Sun (Baltimore), February 6, 1864, p.2.
About one hundred and twenty colored recruits passed through this town on Wednesday and Thursday last, and took the cars....

Cecil Whig (Elkton), January 16, 1864, p. 2.

The Hon. Thomas G. Pratt, ex-Governor of Maryland, who was recently sent to Fortress Monroe to be forwarded across the lines,  returned to this city yesterday....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, January 11, 1864, p. 2.

Every drafted man should consult a Lawyer as to his rights under Act March 3d, '63, under which men are drafted, as it authorizes EXEMPTIONS OR DISCHARGES from service for nerly [sic] FORTY causes....

Southern Aegis and Harford County Intelligencer, January 1, 1864, p. 3.

On Saturday afternoon a bold attempt at murder transpired in the Western Police Station House, Baltimore city....

Valley Register (Middletown), December 4, 1863, p. 2.

To-day has been set aside by the Governor of the State and the President of the United States as a day of thanksgiving, and will generally be observed....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, November 26, 2013, Front Page.

The train which left Baltimore yesterday afternoon at three 'o clock, with the members of the City Council and invited guests, besides a large number of other visitors from the Monumental City and elsewhere, to participate in the dedication of the National Cemetery....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, November 21, 1863, Front Page.

Great surprise and consternation were created in our community on Monday night and Tuesday morning last in consequence of the rude and summary arrest....

Annapolis Gazette, November 12, 1863, p. 2-3

The office of the Daily Gazette, published at Baltimore city, was taken possession of Tuesday last, by the military authorities....

The Valley Register (Middletown), October 2, 1863, p. 2.

The military authorities in Baltimore, it appears, have already commenced to put into practice the illegal suggestions of Judge Bond.  The Steamer Cecil, under military employ and in charge of a Massachusetts officer, has made two excursions to Chester River....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, September 21, 1863, Front Page.

CONTRACTS entered into to insure those subject to the Draft a release from it, and a release is guaranteed in all cases. Terms much less....

Baltimore County Advocate (Towsontown), August 15, 1863, p. 3.

Captain William D. Brown of the Confederate Army, formerly of Baltimore, was one of the wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, and died in a hospital, upon the field, July 10th. Permission was obtained from the military authorities by his father....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, August 3, 1863, p. 4.

The long hoped for "deliverance"of "my Maryland," thought to be indicated by the movements of General Lee, has had the effect of developing in this city a vast deal of disloyalty which for months past has lain quite dormant....

Baltimore American, June 30, 1863.

The position of the rebel force in Pennsylvania and our state, is not, as far as we learn, changed in any essential particular. They have shown no disposition....

The Lutheran Observer, June 26, 2013, p. 2.

On last Friday week [sic] two detachments from the companies of Capt. Raisin and Robert Smith, numbering 92 men, fell into an ambuscade on the road between Berryville and Winchester....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, June 20, 1863, p. 2.

Orders for Southern CURRENCY PROMPTLY EXECUTED. We keep a supply on hand, and can execute orders promptly....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, June 4, 1863, p. 4.

SMITH BROS. & CO., No. 40 W Baltimore st., Baltimore, Md., Have not increased the price of their immense stock of CLOTHING, for MEN & BOYS' WEAR. Having bought at the old prices, we will not charge any extra "tariff"....

Baltimore County Advocate, May 30, 1863, p. 4.

We are now greatly in want of every article of hospital supply, and we need funds, in order to pay the salaries of our chaplains and others who are engaged in visiting the sick and instructing them in the duties....

The Lutheran Observer (Baltimore), May 15, 1863, p. 2. 

About ten 'o clock yesterday morning, a negro, dressed in the uniform of a United States officer, and wearing shoulder-straps indicating that he ranked as a major, entered a train of cars at the President street depot....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, May 4, 1863, p. 4.

By the aid of extensive and intricate machinery, mechanical appliances, chemical effects and ingenious dioramic accompaniments, never before introduced in this country, the audience can almost imagine themselves actual spectators of the sublime.....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, April 27, 1863, p. 2.

A young girl, named Hannah Loftus, residing on the Falls road, some two miles from the city limits, was killed instantly, at six 'o clock last evening, by the accidental discharge....
Baltimore Daily Gazette, April 11, 1863, Front Page.
Mention was made of the fact on Tuesday last that the music publishers of this city had been ordered by General Schenck, through Provost Marshal Fish, to stop the sale of all Southern or "Secession" music....

Baltimore Daily Gazette, March 12, 1863, front page

There are a great many good people who think they see in the abounding corruption of society and our national calamities unmistakable signs of the approaching end....

The Lutheran Observer (Baltimore), February 13, 1863, p. 2.

After an incarceration of seventeen months in four of the Forts of the United States, now converted by the Government into prisons which have no similitude but in the Bastile of France....

Southern Aegis and Harford County Intelligencer, December 13, 1862, p. 2.

Both the Union and the Sentinel newspapers, published at Rockville, Md., have been suspended.  Mr Fields, the editor of the Sentinel, has, it is stated, been arrested....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, November 22, 1862, p. 2.

The relatives and friends of the brave men who fell upon the battle-field of Antietam continue to take up and remove their remains....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, November 1, 1862, p. 2.

The draft of the militia took place in the several counties of Maryland, as well as Baltimore city, on Wednesday last.  It was accompanied by no disturbance, as far as known. In Prince George's county,where some trouble was said to be apprehended.....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, October 18, 1862, p. 3.

"If I were as I have been most of my life, I might perhaps talk amusing to you for half an hour and it wouldn't hurt anybody...."

Baltimore Weekly Sun, October 11, 1862, p. 4.

It is true, the universal desire seems to be that the army should advance, but the dead of Sharpsburg, of Antietam, of Shepardstown, it must be borne in mind, are not yet buried. Heaps of dead bodies are burning in the Cumberland Valley.

The Baltimore Republican, September 26, 1862, p. 4.

The invasion of Maryland by the rebel army is an accomplished fact. With a force variously stated as from twenty to fifty thousand men, during Friday and Saturday, the 6th and 7th inst., they crossed the Potomac....

The Lutheran Observer (Baltimore), September 12, 1862, p. 3.

The large bounty which has been offered by the City Council for recruits in the several Maryland regiments being raised in this city, together with the prospect of a draft....

The Maryland News Sheet (Baltimore), August 12, 1862, p. 4.

Mary McCuskey was arrested yesterday by officer Wilhelm, charged with shouting for Jeff. Davis.  She was held for the Marshal. Andrew Burns was yesterday taken into custody....

The Maryland News Sheet (Baltimore), August 9, 1862, p. 4.

Not since the commencement of the rebellion has Baltimore given a more demonstrative and convincing proof of the loyalty of the masses of her population....
The Cecil Whig, August 2, 1862, p. 2.

Rev. W.E Boardman, who volunteered to visit the hopitals about Annapolis and Baltimore, to minister to the sick and wounded soldiers from Pennsylvania, has written the following letter....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, July 19, 1862, p. 2.

The commissioners to examine the cases of the State prisoners have finished their labors at Fort Warren. Of twenty-nine State prisoners....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, May 17, 1862, p. 3.

R.H. Bigger, Esq., of this city, who has a commission of captain in the Confederate army, has been released from Fort Warren upon his parole not to correspond with the enemies of the United States or to go South....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, May 10, 1862, p. 2.

The resolution of the Maryland Legislature, approved by the Governor, appropriating seven thousand dollars for the relief of the families of the soldiers killed....

The Lutheran Observer (Baltimore), May 2, 1862, p. 4.

The slaves of Prince George's county, we hear, are running away in numbers. - Most of them make their way to this city, having got the idea....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, April 19, 1862, p. 2.

After a lapse of nearly a year, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad is again open throughout its whole length, together with all its branches....

The Baltimore County Advocate (Towsontown, MD), March 29, 1862, p. 2.

Among the most important measures of the week is a bill reported in the House to provide ways and means for the defense of the State of Maryland by raising an amount sufficient....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, February 22, 1862, p. 2.

Applications for passes to go South must be made in person first to the United States Provost Marshal of the city of Baltimore. Such applications must be accompanied by a written statement of the reasons....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, February 15, 1862, p. 2.

On Saturday evening a corporal's guard, belonging to the fifth Maryland regiment, Colonel Schley, came to the city in search of deserters from camp. They entered a low groggery on Pratt Street....

The Maryland News Sheet, January 20, 1862, Front Page.

The members of the First Branch City Council held a meeting a few days since for the purpose of appointing a committee to wait upon Mr. Baker and learn his views in regard to their election....

The South (Baltimore), January 2, 1862, p. 3. 

In consequence of the threatened effectual closing of the Potomac river by the batteries of the Confederates, the government at Washington has notified the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company to hold its road in readniness....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, October 26, 1861, p. 2.  

Immediately after the farce was gone through with yesterday afternoon of calling the roll and adjournment, an unusual stir took place in this community. Companies of the Wisconsin regiment were observed....

The Maryland Times (Baltimore), September 19, 1861, Front Page

We published yesterday, as a current report, that a government agent was in this city buying up all the old schooners, oyster boats, and small vessels....

The Daily Exchange (Baltimore), August 15, 1861, p. 2. 

Still the work of tyranny and oppression go on in Maryland. Baltimore has its Bastile, and its citizens are forced....

The Planters' Advocate (Upper Marlborough), July 17, 1861, p. 2. 

The eighty-fifth anniversary of the declaration of American Independence occurred yesterday, and the observance of it was perhaps more general, in the loyal States, than for many....

The Valley Register (Middletown), July 5, 1861, p. 2.

In the House of Delegates, the bill reported by Mr. Wallis authorizing the Baltimore board of police to temporarily close all drinking saloons, whenever necessary for the preservation of the peace of that city....

The Planters' Advocate (Upper Marlborough, MD), June 12, 1861, Front Page.
Filmed by the Maryland State Archives

Baltimore is to be 'bombarded,' 'shelled,' 'burned with fire,' 'laid in ashes,' 'laid low,' 'crushed,' 'destroyed,' 'annihilated,' 'wiped out,' 'blotted from the map,' 'razed,' 'levelled with the ground'....

 The South (Baltimore), May 23, 1861, p. 3. 

Yesterday morning the excitement which had been gradually rising in this city for some days, with reference to the passage of northern volunteer troops southward, reached its climax....
The Sun (Baltimore), April 20, 1861, Front Page