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Magazines - Journals of Opinion

Both those temporarily tuned into the excitement of the 2008 political season and those with a continuing interest in public affairs, will discover plenty of fuel for debate as well as food for thought in the Pratt Periodicals Department. All of the titles listed below are indexed in the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature.
American Spectator (The)
American Spectator (The)
According to its playful, Menckenesque masthead, "The [AS] was founded in 1924 by George Nathan and Truman Newberry over a cheap domestic ale in McSorley's Old Ale House." In reality, AS was founded as The Alternative by R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. and other conservative students at Indiana University in 1967 as a reaction to campus radicalism.  In 1977, it took the name of Nathan's long-defunct literary magazine. In the 1990s, AS became the voice of anti-Clintonism. Published monthly, AS is known for its wit. Pratt holds this title in paper back to 1977.  It is also available in Pratt electronic databases.
 
Atlantic (The)
Atlantic (The)
AM, also known as The Atlantic, was first published in Boston in 1857 as a literary magazine. Its editors and writers were among the leading lights of the New England literary world. Over the years, AM began to focus more and more on politics, economics, and foreign affairs. Since April 2005, fiction is no longer included in regular issues but rather appears in a separate annual fiction issue. AM articles are lengthy, thoughtful, and represent diverse prespectives.
 
Commentary
Commentary
Commentary, first published in 1945 by the American Jewish Committee, has often been characterized as neo-conservative in its orientation.  It is published monthly, except for a combined July-August issue.  It is indexed in Reader's Guide and Book Review Digest. Pratt holds this title back to 1945 in paper.  It is also full-text searchable in  Pratt electronic databases .
 
Harper's
Harper's
Harper's was founded in 1850 as Harper's New Monthly Magazine, an influential literary magazine. In the 1920s, it began to include material on public affairs along with short stories. Since 1976, Lewis Lapham has edited the magazine from a left-of-center stance.  Each monthly issue includes the famous Harper's Index, a listing of surprising and/or obscure statistical data. For example. "Minimum number of Wiccans currently serving in the military: 1,870" (July 2007).
 
Mother Jones
Mother Jones
Mary Harris or Mother Jones (1837?-1930) was a fiery American labor organizer. Like its namesake, MJ magazine agitates from the left side of the political spectrum. According to its Website, "[MJ] is an independent nonprofit whose roots lie in a commitment to social justice implemented through first rate investigative reporting."  MJ was founded in 1976 and is published bimonthly.
 
Nation (The)
Nation (The)
The Nation was founded in 1865 by Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) and Edwin L. Godkin (1831-1902). It is the oldest continuously published weekly U.S. periodical. In 1918 when Oswald Garrison Villard (1872-1949) took over its ownership and editorship, The Nation moved to the left and has stayed there ever since. It has one of the largest circulations of any journal of opinion.
 
National Review (The)
National Review (The)
NR was founded in 1955 by William F. Buckley, Jr. and is the longest running opinion journal of movement conservatism.  NR is published biweekly.  In the issue pictured here (January 29, 2007), NR editorialized in favor of the troop surge in Iraq.
 
New Republic (The)
New Republic (The)
Founded in 1914 by William Straight with Herbert Croly as its first editor, TNR was an influential weekly voice of progressivism and liberalism. In 1946, former Vice President Henry Wallace took over as editor and moved the magazine further to the left.  In the 1980s, the magazine began to take a more conservative stance. Currently, it might be described as middle-of-the-road.  
 
Progressive (The)
Progressive (The)
Founded by Wisconsin Senator Robert M. La Follette Sr. in 1909 as La Follette's Weekly, the magazine changed its name to The Progressive in 1929. It became a monthly in 1948. According to its Website, "[it] has steadfastly stood against militarism, the concentration of power in corporate hands, and the disenfranchisement of the citizenry. It has continued to champion peace, social and economic justice, civil rights, civil liberties, human rights, a preserved environment, and a reinvigorated democracy. Its bedrock values remain nonviolence and freedom of speech." 
 
Weekly Standard (The)
Weekly Standard (The)
WS was founded in 1995 by William Kristol and is edited by Kristol and Fred Barnes. It's list of contributing editors reads like a Who's Who of the neo-conservative movement in American politics. 
 
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