Showing category: Washington County (see recent posts)
There is much as yet unpublished in relation to the late rebel invasion...

Baltimore Sun, July 16, 1864, p.1

Stores robbed and property destroyed...

Valley Register (Middletown) July 8, 1864, p.2

A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press relates many incidents of the passage of the rebel troops through Hagerstown and Williamsport, Md, into Pennsylvania....
The Valley Register (Middletown), July 10, 1863, Front Page.

On last Friday night three deserters from the Union army came up the Jefferson road and passed on to Boonsboro, committing a series of daring robberies....

Valley Register (Middletown), January 9, 1863, p. 2.

Parties residing near the South Mountain battle-field amused themselves on Christmas day by causing the explosion of a large number of unexploded shells....

The Valley Register (Middletown), January 2, 1863, p. 2.

The relatives and friends of the brave men who fell upon the battle-field of Antietam continue to take up and remove their remains....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, November 1, 1862, p. 2.

It is true, the universal desire seems to be that the army should advance, but the dead of Sharpsburg, of Antietam, of Shepardstown, it must be borne in mind, are not yet buried. Heaps of dead bodies are burning in the Cumberland Valley.

The Baltimore Republican, September 26, 1862, p. 4.

A great many people from home and abroad have visited the battle-field near this place, and the most heart-rending accounts are given of the sufferings....

The Valley Register (Middletown), September 19, 1862, Front Page. 

This has been an eventful day in the history of the rebellion. A battle has taken place in which the Army of the Potomac has again been victorious and which exceeded in extent any battle heretofore fought on this continent....

The Valley Register (Middletown), September 19, 1862, p. 2.

President Lincoln in his message to Congress has called for four hundred millions of dollars to carry on the war. Direct taxation must be resorted to. Sugar, coffee, tea, salt, the necessaries of life, will be taxed....

The Hagerstown Mail, August 2, 1861, p. 2-3.