Showing category: Militias (see recent posts)
About one hundred and twenty colored recruits passed through this town on Wednesday and Thursday last, and took the cars....

Cecil Whig (Elkton), January 16, 1864, p. 2.

The appearance of the Rebel Army in York county caused many citizens to flee from their homes and seek safety in this....

The Cecil Whig (Elkton), July 4, 1862, p. 2.

Md. Vols. has again moved. They have gone to Berryville, Va., a small village about halfway between Harper's Ferry....

The Cecil Whig (Elkton), April 4, 1863, p. 2.

Some time since, a portion of Captain Clayton's Company of Calvary, belonging to the Maryland Purnell Legion, whilst engaged in looking up absent drafted men, stopped at the hotel....
Baltimore County Advocate, January 17, 1863, p. 2.
 

Volunteers for the army should not leave the city until supplied with Holloway's Pills and Ointment. For Sores, Scurvy, Wounds, Small Pox, Fevers, and Bowel Complaints.....

Baltimore County Advocate, January 10, 1863, p. 2.

The draft of the militia took place in the several counties of Maryland, as well as Baltimore city, on Wednesday last.  It was accompanied by no disturbance, as far as known. In Prince George's county,where some trouble was said to be apprehended.....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, October 18, 1862, p. 3.

The regulations for enrolling and drafting the Militia, issued by the Secretary of War under an order by the President calling for 300,000 men....

The Cambridge Herald, August 27, 1862, p. 2.

The large bounty which has been offered by the City Council for recruits in the several Maryland regiments being raised in this city, together with the prospect of a draft....

The Maryland News Sheet (Baltimore), August 12, 1862, p. 4.

Among the most important measures of the week is a bill reported in the House to provide ways and means for the defense of the State of Maryland by raising an amount sufficient....

Baltimore Weekly Sun, February 22, 1862, p. 2.

Towsontown Surrounded and Taken!--No Lives Lost!--Saturday last was a day long to be remembered in Towsontown. While the people were quietly engaged in the usual vocations (a large proportion doing nothing)....

Baltimore County Advocate (Towsontown), June 8, 1861, p. 2.

An ominous suspension of all intelligence from Charleston throughout yesterday induced very general belief that hostilities had commenced between the South Carolina troops and Fort Sumter....

The Sun (Baltimore), April 13, 1861, p.2.